Facebook Calls On Users To Send Nudes In Revenge Porn Crackdown

Posted November 10, 2017

Four percent of internet users in the USA have been victims of revenge porn and 10 percent of women under the age of 30 have had someone threaten to expose explicit photos of them online, according to a 2016 study by the research institute Data & Society.

Facebook is asking some users to send nude photos of themselves in an effort to combat social media "revenge porn". Stamos is using the abbreviated form of "non-consensual intimate image", more colloquial known as revenge porn.

If it violates Facebook policies, the company would create a digital fingerprint of the picture so that it could be recognized and blocked if its uploaded again.

They will keep the blurred image for some time to ensure the technology is working correctly before deleting it.

A Facebook spokesman told the Telegraph: This is an initial pilot in Australia.

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Antigone Davis, Facebook's head of global safety, said the system is being trialled in the UK, US, Australia and Canada.

"The safety and well-being of the Facebook community is our top priority", Davis said. Australia's eSafety Commission said Facebook doesn't store the image, it stores a link and uses artificial intelligence to sort out the pictures. The company considered blurring out images before they ended up in the hands of human reviewers, but decided against it because that may have resulted in accidentally hashing legitimate images. So Facebook is saying there shouldn't be easy workarounds like changing some basic aspect of the photo file to bypass the company's detection system.

Users wanting to take part in the trial must first file a report with the commissioner, who will in turn share it with Facebook. "Once they delete the image from the thread, we will delete the image from our servers".

Users would upload their nude photos to Facebook and a trained community operations team would review the photo. It used this to prevent the image spreading and closed down the majority of accounts reported to it as hosting such images.